PEP

The last HIV rescue

PEP - post-exposure prophylaxis

Contact with the infected person's blood, sperm, or other material does not necessarily mean that you will also become infected with HIV. An early post-exposure procedure can protect you from infection.

What's PEP?

Post-exposure prophylaxis which aims to prevent HIV, HBV, HCV infections potentially acquired as a result of sexual, professional and reliable exposure.

When should PEP start?

Best within the first 24 hours from a risky situation. The maximum time to administer drugs is 72 hours. Every hour after a day from a risky situation reduces their effectiveness.

It is a set of procedures and studies to determine whether there was a risk, what kind of risk it was, what kind of diseases it could potentially be associated with and to decide whether to take drugs. It concerns the prophylactic use of drugs against HIV, for other sexually transmitted diseases and possibly vaccination, e.g. against hepatitis B.

What to do after a risky situation?

You should report to the medical facility dealing with post-exposure proceedings.

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When is contact risky?
What to do after a risky contact?
1
Clean mucous membranes of infectious material

For example, rinse your mouth, wash your penis, rinse your vagina and anus. Be careful not to damage the mucous membranes.

2
Talk to your partner

Ask about his/her current tests and risks related to HIV and other sexually transmitted infections.

3
If your partner is infected, ask for current results

It is best for the decision to include prevention to be made by a doctor who has access to the test results of the infected person.

4
Report to your doctor / medical facility

Contact a specialized facility that may decide to include drugs related to post-exposure HIV prevention. To avoid this potential risk, a decision is made to implement PEP prophylaxis.

The sooner, the better

Usually the risk of transmission of diseases associated with sexual intercourse is mutual, so it is best to make an appointment for a joint tests as soon as possible after the risky situation.

Do it together

Usually tests for HIV and other sexually related diseases, even if they were negative, have been performed earlier and therefore it is necessary to make an appointment with the person who was the source of the risk.

You can prevent this

Successful treatment of HIV infection significantly reduces the risk of transmitting the infection to another person during sexual intercourse, but when there is a risk, you need to be sure of it

Find out if you are exposed

Sexual exposition

When is there a risk?
When the mucous membranes come into contact with potentially infectious material of a person we cannot be sure if she is not HIV positive or we know she is infected, but we do not know if she is fully effective antiretroviral treatment.
Who is exposed?
People with active sex life
Infectious material

Semen

Blood

Rectal discharge

Exudation from the reproductive tract

Professional exposition

When is there a risk?
When damaged skin or mucous membranes are exposed to potentially infectious material in the course of a professional activity. This is treated as an accident at work.
Who is exposed?
Medical personnel at all levels, laboratory staff, police, municipal police, medical and non-medical staff of prisons, cleaning staff, etc.
Infectious material

Blood

Serum

Plasma

Pleural fluid

Exudation from the reproductive tract

Synovial fluid

Purulent content

Semen

Peritoneal fluid

Not infectious saliva, urine, faeces without blood

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Infectious material

Blood

Serum

Plasma

Pleural fluid

Exudation from the reproductive tract

Synovial fluid

Purulent content

Semen

Peritoneal fluid

Occupational and non-professional exhibitions and the so-called "accidents" (accidental needle stabbing, sexual violence) are operated within the NFZ in specialized facilities. This also applies to the cost of drugs taken as part of the post-exposure procedure.

Other exposures (not related to occupational activities or accidents) resulting from voluntary exposure to sexually transmitted diseases (including HIV) may be dealt with by the NFZ in a specialist clinic. However, drugs used in the post-exposure procedure are purchased in publicly available pharmacies at the patient's expense.

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